Twitter suffered an outage at a sensitive time for Elon Musk

Oliver Dollery/AFP The blackout affected Twitter the night of Wednesday, December 28th to Thursday, December 29th (illustrative photo: Elon Musk on October 4th in Washington).

Oliver Dollery/AFP

The blackout affected Twitter the night of Wednesday, December 28th to Thursday, December 29th (illustrative photo: Elon Musk on October 4th in Washington).

Internet – “It’s all right for me”. without any worries, Elon Musk On Wednesday evening, December 28th, he responded to a user who asked him if Twitter was “broken”. The crash affected the platform on the night of Wednesday, December 28th to Thursday, December 29th. Some users can no longer log into their own accounts or see certain other accounts.

Downdetector located around 10,000 reports of netizens struggling to use Twitter, peaking around 1:35 a.m. in Paris, before the reports settled.

The extent of the outage was not immediately known, but AFP journalists in the United States and Asia reported that they had difficulty accessing their accounts. According to the NetBlocks web monitor, these are international outages and “Not related to national internet outages or filtering”.

Outages regularly disrupt digital platforms, with long service outages being the exception. This technical snag, however, comes at a sensitive time for Twitter, which has been in turmoil since its $44 billion acquisition by Elon Musk at the end of October. The multi-entrepreneur has laid off several employees, including among the teams handling technical maintenance of the platform.

The sulphurous billionaire is also under fire from critics for his comment Journalist accounts Or daily lunar publications.

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Users who use Twitter on the web interface are affected

Outside the United States, the number of users unable to access the service ranged from a few hundred to several thousand.

As detailed by DownDetector, the December 28 outage appears to primarily affect people using Twitter on the web interface. About 10% of the complaints recorded by the screen came from mobile application users.

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