The EU regains vaccine control, while the UK reduces noise

The European Union on Monday sought to regain control of the slow-running anti-Govt vaccination campaign to speed things up, as opposed to the lead taken by the United Kingdom, which began to loosen its grip by returning to school in small English.

European Commission President Ursula van der Leyen said yesterday that he expects the “100 million dose per month” vaccine to be delivered to the EU in the second quarter. “Total 300 million by the end of June” increase in distribution rate and close approval of new products. The chief executive also warned that other EU countries could block exports of the Covit-19 vaccine, as Italy did last week to supply AstraZeneca to Australia.

Italy, which crossed the 100,000 death toll yesterday due to Govt, spoke of a shortage in Europe and an urgent need to justify its decision in Australia. Rome on Monday approved the administration of the AstraZeneca vaccine to people over 65 years of age.

However, an official from the European Drug Administration (EMA) on Monday “advised” that EU member states urgently need to approve the Russian vaccine Sputnik V, saying there is not enough data on those who have been vaccinated since Hungary administers it last month.

In Austria, a batch of astrogeneca vaccine was removed after the death of a nurse, although no “causal link” has been established by health officials in this case.

Back to school

Across the channel, little Britons returned to school on Monday, starting with children aged 5 to 11, the first step in a gradual exit from the third prison, which was introduced in the country in January.

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Thanks to its massive vaccination campaign – the first payment of 22 million – London has eased the most stringent rules affecting social life. The reopening of non-essential shops and terraces of pubs and restaurants is scheduled for April 12, before all restrictions expected on June 21 are lifted.

Germany also lifted some restrictions on Monday: bookstores, florists and driving schools, which had already reopened in London, were re-accredited to welcome visitors across the country.

But other states have tightened the screw. In Finland, new restrictions came into effect on Monday, including the closure of bars and restaurants. Tito in Hungary is facing a resurgence of the epidemic, where schools and most shops and businesses will have to close their doors.

In France, part of the north of the country enjoyed its first weekend of control, a four-week operation to combat the spread of particularly severe British variation in the region.

Fatigue and anger against control measures also require extreme caution on the part of governments, which are torn between the need and the essential approval to control the epidemic.

population.

Almost normal life

In contrast, Israel returned to almost normal life over the weekend for new restructuring measures. “This is a great day, we open restaurants with green passports and we come back to life,” Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu told the Israeli mayor of the Holy City, Moses Leon, as he sat on the terrace of a hotel in Jerusalem on Sunday.

The country is also relying on an ambitious immunization campaign to ease restrictions, issuing this “green passport” to those who have been vaccinated in two doses – or those who have been rescued from Govt-19. The Hebrew government, the world’s most advanced nation, has already paid more than 57% of its population (almost 44% for both doses), according to a report released Monday. The country also officially launched a vaccination campaign for Palestinians who immigrated to Israel or the occupied West Bank yesterday.

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In the United States, which provides more than 90 million doses for nearly 18% of its population, vaccinated people can now meet in small groups indoors without wearing masks and respecting social distance.

More than 304.8 million drugs worldwide are being administered by anti-govt vaccines, but this figure obscures deep inequalities. Thus the poorest countries rely on the World Health Organization (WHO) Kovacs device to measure. Govt-19 has killed at least 2.59 million people worldwide since the outbreak began.

Source: AFP

The European Union on Monday sought to regain control of the slow-moving anti-Govt vaccination campaign to speed things up, as opposed to the lead taken by the United Kingdom, which began to loosen its grip by returning to school for little English. European Commission President Ursula van der Leyen said yesterday that “100 million doses …

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