NASA released audio recordings of the first wind noises and laser effects captured on Mars

NASA agency The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has released two historical records of a surface Mars Wednesday.

In the first audio clip, it was recorded using two Perseverance Mars spacecraft MicrophonesListeners can hear the wind.

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In their Posted on SoundCloud, NASA described the sound as “listening to a seashell or a hand hanging over the ear.”

They received the sound from the machine on February 19, after around 6 PM. Landing on Jizero Crater.

They explained that “the mast of the rover carrying the microphone was still stored on the deck of the stationary ship, and thus the sound was muffled.”

In the second stanzaIn an audio clip recorded on March 2, listeners can hear the effects of a laser on a rocky target.

“The 30 impacts are audible, some slightly louder than others. NASA wrote that the differences in the intensity of the launch sounds will provide information about the targets’ physical structure, such as their relative stiffness or the presence of weather-resistant layers. In Navajo), it was about 10 feet (3.1 m) away. ”

Both recordings were captured using the rover SuperCam, Which is a rock vaporizer Installed on the “head” Rover masts that will help scientists search for fossils on the Red Planet.

In the clip containing audible winds, the mast on which the microphone rests is still stored, making the sound muffled, something that the researcher, planetary scientist and the Higher Institute of Space (ISAE-SUPERAO) discussed during a joint report. Wednesday’s conference with the National Center for Space Studies (CNES) and NASA.

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“First of all, on Mars, we have a very low air pressure. It’s actually 150 times lower than the atmospheric pressure. Ter. In addition, the atmosphere is composed of carbon dioxide, as Murdoch explained, “These two factors together mean that sound does not travel in the same way across the surface of Mars as it is on Earth.”

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“For this reason, the SuperCam microphone is particularly sensitive. This allows us to record sounds despite the very weak Martian atmosphere.

The March 2020 rover is the third time the microphone has been sent to Mars.

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