In the United Kingdom, inflation eased to 2% in July – economic policy

Inflation in the UK fell to 2% in July on the back of moderate prices for clothing and leisure items, the National Statistics Office (ONS) said on Wednesday.

The country’s inflation reached 2.5% in June, the highest level since August 2018, ONS recalls in a press release.

This recession is mainly explained by the recession in the apparel sector, + 1.7% in July and + 3% in June.

Prices for games and toys fell sharply, and audio-visual equipment and books soared at low speeds.

One year after the shock of the epidemic, Jonathan Ado, a statistician at the ONS, underscores that “inflation eased in July on the total line of goods and services, including clothing, as summer sales returned.”

However, economists believe that inflation should accelerate again by the end of this year as economies around the world are restarted.

The Bank of England (BoE) estimated in early August that UK inflation would rise to 4% temporarily in the fourth quarter, before falling.

“We expect inflation to accelerate further later in the year and advance beyond the Bank of England’s 2% target because supply chains are under pressure.

The country’s inflation reached 2.5% in June, the highest level since August 2018, ONS recalls in a press release. This recession is mainly explained by the recession in the apparel sector, + 1.7% in July and + 3% in June. Prices for games and toys fell sharply, and audio-visual equipment and books soared at low speeds. One year after the shock of the epidemic, Jonathan Ado, a statistician at the ONS, underscores that “inflation eased in July on the total line of goods and services, including clothing, as summer sales returned.” However, economists believe that inflation should accelerate again by the end of this year as economies around the world are restarted. The Bank of England (BoE) estimated in early August that UK inflation would rise to 4% temporarily in the fourth quarter, before falling. “We expect inflation to accelerate further later in the year and advance beyond the Bank of England’s 2% target because supply chains are under pressure.

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