Donald Trump calls on Republicans to turn their leader in the Senate

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War has been declared among Republicans. The former US president has not yet digested the words of Mitch McConnell, who has been blamed for the attack on the Capitol. So Donald Trump is calling on Republicans to step down from their presidency in the Senate.

Donald Trump on Tuesday, Feb. 16 in the Senate ousted Republican leader Mitch McCann and called on his party to return this senior veteran of Congress, publicly accusing former U.S. President Capitol of being “responsible.”

The most sensible man since leaving the White House, the 45th President of the United States is thus declaring open war with this brilliant strategist who has long been his ally, the symbolic divorce that is now severing Republicans.

“Mitch is a bad politician who never smiles, and if the Republican senators stay with him they will no longer win,” the former president wrote in a bad statement. “Republicans can never be respected or strong again with political ‘leaders like Mitch McConnell,” he stressed. “Now, his number in the” elections “is lower than ever, and he is destroying the Senate Republican Party, while at the same time doing the worst harm to our country,” Donald Trump said.

“True and Moral Responsibility”

Mitch McConnell, 78, voted Saturday in his Senate hearing to release a Republican millionaire, saying the upper house was not qualified to question him. But in the process, he declared that he was “truly and morally responsible” for the attack on Capitol, which killed five people.

By denying his defeat in the November 3 presidential election, the rioters acted in this way “because the most powerful man on the planet fed them with lies.” In the same dark speech, he took care to emphasize that Donald Trump, now a “simple citizen,” could still be prosecuted. “He is still responsible for everything he did while in office. He has not escaped anything so far,” he said.

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The senators were in the majority – 57 out of 100 – to vote for the millionaire’s sentence. Including seven Republicans. But it would have taken more than two-thirds (67 votes) to reach a conviction, following which Donald Trump could have been unqualified.

With AFP

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