Biden nominates Scott Miller as US ambassador to Switzerland

US President Joe Biden expects to retain political appointments in about 30% of ambassadorial elections. Copyright 2021 Associated Press. All rights reserved

US President Joe Biden has appointed Scott Miller, a gay rights activist and philanthropist, to be his administration’s envoy to Switzerland and Liechtenstein.

This content was published on Aug 7, 2021 – 10:53

AP / Keystone-SDA / ts

Miller, the former vice president of accounts at UBS Wealth Management in Denver, and her husband, Tim Gill, founder of Quark planning software, are two notable philanthropists who have donated at least $3.6 million. (3.3 million francs) for Democratic candidates and issues. . . . From the year 2010.

Scott Miner © Matthew Staver, gillfoundation.org

This includes $365,000 earmarked for Biden’s general election fundraising efforts, according to federal fundraising disclosures. Although they donated at least $1.1 million to support Hillary Clinton’s presidential nomination in 2016, they also donated $50,000 in that election to a group called the Biden Draft, which wanted Biden to appear in that year’s primary, As records appear.

Miller, 41, and Jill, 67, married in Boston in 2009 and according to Jill FoundationExternal link, are the largest contributors to LGBTQ equality in history.

Miller holds a Bachelor of Science with Honors in Business Administration from the University of Colorado at Boulder. He started his career as a management consultant for Accenture, then as an event planner for international clients.

It is not yet known when he will take up his post in Berne. You must first appear before the US Senate for a hearing, before presenting your credentials to the Swiss government. The post of the US Embassy in Switzerland and Liechtenstein has been vacant since January.

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Miller replaced Edward McMullen, one of Donald Trump’s early supporters who helped Trump win the Republican primary in South Carolina.

Policy

Presidents often award the best ambassadors as awards to political allies and major donors. These appointments often come with the expectation that the appointees will be able to foot the entertainment bill on behalf of the United States with a large and expensive capital.

About 44% of appointments as ambassadors to Trump were political, compared to 31% for Barack Obama and 32% for George W. Bush, according to the American Foreign Service Association. Biden hopes to retain political appointments in about 30% of ambassador elections, according to an administration official who spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity to discuss internal conversations.

Most political appointments from the donor class, a small group that is predominantly white, have had little impact on foreign policy.

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