9:03 pm – Coronavirus: Updating the global epidemic

New measures, new reports, and highlights: An update on the latest developments in the Covid-19 pandemic around the world.

– AstraZeneca: Resume Vaccination –

Germany, France, Italy, Bulgaria and Slovenia on Friday resumed vaccination with the AstraZeneca vaccine, which the European Medicines Agency (EMA) declared “safe and effective” the previous day.

Experts from the World Health Organization, in turn, felt that the benefits associated with this vaccine outweighed the risks. About 15 countries suspended it as a precaution, fearing dangerous side effects.

On the other hand, you will wait for Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Finland announced the suspension on Friday at least until March 29.

In France, the health authority recommended Friday that it be reserved for 55 years and more.

Like his British counterpart, Boris Johnson, French Prime Minister Jean Castex received his first dose of AstraZeneca. German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi have said that they will receive this vaccine.

Germany: Rapid increase in injuries

Public Health Monitoring Institute (RKI) vice president Robert Koch said Germany is facing a “very clearly exponential” increase in Covid-19 infections, linked in particular to the spread of the British alternative.

Angela Merkel and the leaders of the 16 states will meet on Monday to decide on possible new lockdowns. The German Chancellor said she is ready to order the Russian Covid Sputnik V vaccine for her country if it is authorized by the European Union, while she has been widely criticized for the slow pace of the vaccination campaign in Germany.

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– “Flambée” in Belgium –

Belgian Minister of Health Frank Vandenbruck confirmed that Belgium recorded a week ago an “outbreak” of new infections and an acceleration of hospital treatment, which requires “tightening the screws” on restrictions and the barrier gestures.

– Papua: May be ‘out of control’ –

International aid is too slow to avert a health disaster in Papua New Guinea, which is experiencing a pandemic, according to an official from Doctors Without Borders (MSF).

– The Group of Seven to provide new aid to poor countries –

According to a press release from the British Treasury, the Group of Seven finance ministers, who met via video link on Friday under the auspices of the United Kingdom, are supporting new aid to disadvantaged countries weakened by the pandemic, through the International Monetary Fund.

– France maintains growth forecast –

The French government said on Friday that the French government is maintaining its 6% growth forecast for this year despite tightening restrictions in the face of the pandemic.

Relief in American schools

US health authorities have relaxed the recommendations in effect in schools to confront Covid-19, by reducing the recommended distance between students in the classroom.

– Survey in Norway –

Norwegian police have opened an investigation after the embarrassing revelation that Prime Minister Erna Solberg and her family had violated anti-Covid guidelines. The prime minister apologized.

On her 60th birthday at the end of February, Solberg gathered her family at a ski resort, bypassing rules and recommendations to limit social interactions, NRK public broadcaster revealed.

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– Rio’s beaches closed –

Rio de Janeiro announced the closure of the beaches of the Brazilian giant this weekend in an effort to curb pollution, when hospital admissions in intensive care reached a record high.

– More than 2.69 million deaths

The epidemic has killed at least 2,692,313 people worldwide since the start of the epidemic, according to a report prepared by AFP from official sources on Friday at 11:00 GMT.

The United States is the country with the largest number of deaths (539,699), followed by Brazil (287,499), Mexico (196,606), India (159,370) and the United Kingdom (125,926).

These figures, which are based on the daily reports of health authorities without including statistically based reassessments, are generally underestimated.

burs-ang-paj / cds / lch

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